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Cognitive Development

On the Results

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What the 'Brains' Have to Say

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"What Does Love Mean?" From E-mail

How amazing are these responses?!? Extroidinary I’d Say!  The responses from the children show that their environment plays a great role. The motive for love is actions and deeds. However, it seems like what they say gives more meaning to love because they see it so true. The word choices by some of the children sounded awkward, but in context, it “made sense”. Unlike older ‘brains’ who sit and contemplate about what the meaning of a word is or how to use a word, these children used which ever and where ever they wished because they did not know any other word. It is almost as if the more we know the less creative we are.

Spiral, Horizontal Line Spinning

6 years old

E.D. was fairly quiet, but was excited to see what I had to show him. His responses were fairly short and for the most part he named the symbols and everything he saw in the picture. I was biased coming into the experiment due to my prior knowledge of the email responses; therefore, it was difficult for me to restrain from saying, “What else?!?!”

 

8 years old

N.H. was peppy and was eager to respond to the questions. Her responses were conversational rather than abrupt and short. She referred to her experiences with her friends and family often. She attempts to go beyond generic descriptions of what the picture show and assigned roles.

 

10 years old

C.D. was quiet, reserved, and reserved. His responses were very mature and varied greatly from the other responses. He showed a significant difference from the 6 years old response. There were some grammatical errors, but he had a wide variety of vocabulary usage. His description of the heart surprised me. He showed considerable levels of abstract thinking and perspective taking.

 

12 years old

M.G. thrillingly volunteered himself to be used as a part of my project; however, he was extremely quiet and nervous when I asked him the questions. At some points he looked confused. His responses did not go above and beyond the 10 years old response as expected. There were certain questions that he answered more intuitively than others.

 

 

There are conclusions and correlations I could draw with the children’s responses, but I am not adequately qualified for correct analysis.

Developmental Psychology PY241
Dr.Harris
TF: Dr.Cara Diyanni
Spring 2006
Vy Vy Vu